Category Archives: Libraries and Reading

SOMA|South of Market, SF

Please join us
Thursday, November 30 for the opening reception

4:30-7:30,
2nd floor, Rosenberg Library, Ocean Campus
CCSF, 50 Phelan Ave.

Welcome to the SOMA. Three artist-led teams are working in the South of Market to create new artwork with neighborhood residents and businesses. Deep engagement in the SOMA is producing innovative projects and power packed imagery by multigenerational participants. Each team has a different focus, a different vision.

The work of the three teams brings into focus the way that working class neighborhoods in concert with artists can powerfully express, strengthen and advocate for a working class/working artist perspective in all our under-assault neighborhoods. The three distinct projects serve as a laboratory for building resilience , countering gentrification and celebrating grass roots culture through three very different lenses.

The three collaborations will continue throughout the Spring of 2018. Parts of this exhibition will change and transform as the teams develop their projects. Enjoy the first iteration and check back later in the spring for the second installment of this exhibition.

The exhibition is divided into 3 parts:

Pinoy Stories in Words and Pictures:
Illustrator Don Aguillo in tandem with illustrator/writer Raf Salazar, and Kulintang Arts, Inc. (KulArts) are collaborating to create Pinoy Superheroes Here and Now!, spotlighting untold stories of everyday Pilipino heroes who live or work in San Francisco’s South of Market neighborhood. Aguillo and Salazar will create a graphic novel-style episodic comic book that will be available in print and online, as well as six posters based on the comic book.

We Live Here:
Multidisciplinary artist Jerome Reyes and the South of Market Community Action Network (SOMCAN), are collaborating on a multi-platform political campaign that generates and circulates artwork throughout the neighborhood. Materials created through the “We Live Here” project are focused on local issues that SOMCAN members of immigrant youth and families are collectively organizing on so they can live, work and thrive in San Francisco.

Means of Exchange: 
Artists Weston Teruya and Kimberley Arteche are partnering with Kearny Street Workshop to create “Means of Exchange,” engaging with small businesses in San Francisco’s rapidly changing South of Market district to co-create art products and pop-up businesses. The artists will spend time meeting, building trust, and offering artmaking activities to varied South of Market enterprises, eventually working with
four or more businesses to co-create artworks that highlight different facets of South of Market life.

Thank you: Friends of the CCSF Library for supporting Library Exhibitions, The Creative Work Fund for supporting these three projects; Mark Albright for signage, David Liang for installation assistance, Johanna Rudolph for printing and, as always, Vanessa Williams for all her work to make the Library a welcoming place.

Kate Connell
Curator, Library Exhibition Program

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Filed under Art and Activism, Book Arts, City College Community, Cultural Studies, Fine Art, Libraries and Reading, Neighborhoods, San Francisco History

Rough Resemblance

Celebrating 80 Years of Forum Magazine

Established in 1937, Forum Magazine is a student-run literary journal that serves the City College of San Francisco community. Forum magazine is a reflection of the work, and the work is a reflection of a particular time. The interest of this exhibit, “Rough Resemblance: Celebrating 80 Years of Forum Magazine,” is to demonstrate that a fellowship of artists can be found despite individual experiences and historical differences. Two striking features of Forum magazine are content and form. A wide range of views have been expressed in the eight decades of Forum’s publication. Remarkably, noticeable themes like identity, technology, and habitat repeat and overlap across decades. Additionally, student editors have fiddled with Forum’s style for decades, building a legacy of unique perspectives. No issue looks exactly like another: cover design, magazine shape, formatting, and layout are periodically standardized or differentiated.

The City College of San Francisco community continues to grow, and many entrants to this community are unaware of Forum‘s legacy. The literary publication serves both the contributors and the students who produce the magazine. For the talented authors, poets, and visual artists the magazine is a platform for their unique voice. For the students responsible for production, they learn technical copy editing and publishing skills while engaging in the local literary community. Forum Magazine is looking for original works of Fiction, Non-Fiction, Poetry, Drama, Memoir, Essays, Comics, Photographs, Paintings, Etchings and more. Email submissions to submissions@forumccsf.org

The Creative Writing Certificate is supported by City College of San Francisco’s English Department. Students interested in participating in the publication of Forum Magazine should review CCSF’s course catalog (ENGL 35L/M).

Guest Curators: Natasha Forner and Isabel Magdaleno

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National Library Week

April 9-15, 2017

In 1975, the American Library Association took complete charge of National Library Week, which since 1958 had been under the auspices of both the National Book Committee of the American Book Publishers Association and the American Library Association.

City College of San Francisco Librarian Rita Jones spearheaded a drive for endorsements from persons of fame and reputation. Even though “Information Power” served as the national motto, alerting to the nascent information revolution, the emphasis on books, on reading, and the library as a people’s university remained foremost in the sentiments of those whom Ms Jones entreated for support.

Mayor Alioto    Maya Angelou (2)

Thus, Mayor Joseph Alioto, in Proclamation: “Libraries enable people to partake of all the knowledge, facts, culture and tradition that are found in the printed word.”

Maya Angelou: “When a family or community, state, nation or species finds itself in perilous times, that body is most supported when it goes to its heroes, living or dead, for inspiration.”

Willie Brown Shirley Chisolm (2)

Willie Brown: “The City College Library and the San Francisco Public Library represent, in fact, a free university…particularly for low income individuals. A library is one of the resources that I have used to make my case in the classroom, the courtroom and on the floor of the Legislature.”

Shirley Chisolm: “To succeed…you must be able to read and comprehend and to express yourself…Books are the keys to a World of excitement and enlightenment!”

Frances Ford Coppola: “Success and fame mean being able to bring about the things that you dream about.”

Ethel Crockett, California State Librarian: “What a fine idea you have to highlight the library during National Library Week.” Evan as “Libraries … are in the maelstrom of change, adding new dimensions as they respond to our need … for both information and pleasure.”

Bing Crosby Marge Fong Eu

Bing Crosby: “I am deeply concerned over the fact that very few of our young people are inclined to do a great deal of reading. They rather watch television, and I think they are losing a great deal by this inclination.”

Kathryn Crosby: “Keep Reading!”

Mervyn Dymally, Lieutenant Governor: “The unemployed and the millionaire all have the same access to our public libraries.”

Marge Fong Eu, Secretary of State: “The library is ‘the people’s university’… In the library, complete equality of opportunity is a reality. I encourage all … to explore the treasures…”

Lawrence Ferlinghetti Jose Feliciano

Lawrence Ferlinghetti: “Light Heat & Power to You”

Jose Feliciano: “Although my reading is limited by what has been translated into Braille, I do try to read a bit of everything and I have quite a library.”

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Celebrating 80 Years: City College is STILL Your College

ccsf 80 typewriter ccsf 80 40s 50s g00d  ccsf 80 truth freak ccsf 80 sansei
Click on images to enlarge

May 5, 2015-February 4, 2016
3rd Floor Atrium, Rosenberg Library
Click here for Library hours.

City College of San Francisco has had a college newspaper since it began. This exhibition, a collaboration with CCSF’s Journalism Department, tells the College’s history through articles from The Guardsman archive. “The Guardsman is really the prime source of reporting for the college, both on student matters and on governance. Without it, there would be little narrative of the college past, certainly not with the level and breadth of coverage that The Guardsman has given us,” says Dr. Christopher Kox, Interim Dean of the City College Library.

BUILDING THE FOUNDATIONS
Originally titled Emanon (“no name” spelled backwards), The Guardsman switched to its current title after only a few issues. The push for a centralized campus for the “trolley car college” became a major theme in the paper’s early days before the construction of the landmark science building in 1940. “We got plenty of nothing,” complains a 1937 article on the far-flung City College locations of the time. The dirt and photos in this case show the building of the new campus on “Windy Hill 29” (out of San Francisco’s 49) while an early spread in the paper illustrates the complex printing process of the pre-digital age.

ccsf 80 contemp award better ccsf 80 black theater reflection ccsf 80 70s flag girl ccsf 80 contemp mac
Click on images to enlarge

CITY COLLEGE IS YOUR COLLEGE
The paper’s history reflects City College’s unique niche as an urban community college in one of the country’s most diverse cities.
During World War II, Ruth Kay, whose family fled Nazi Germany, shares her story, while a headline from the same page ruminates on “The Superiority of Negro Street Car Conductors” under a cartoon of
Adolph Hitler. The school’s mission of inclusivity and job training are echoed throughout its pages. Post-World War II, married veterans lived in on-campus Quonset huts built under the GI Bill, while flyers and pamphlets emphasize the range of classes and training programs available to students.

INCLUSION AND RADICALISM
“Transexuality is a reality” proclaims a 1977 Guardsman headline. The article profiles a transgender sex worker and City College student, including quotes from a registrar assuring students that sex had no bearing on admission. In 1968, The Associated Students Council founded an alternative paper, The Free Critic. From La Raza Unida to the Women’s Resource Center to the Black Student’s Union, the Critic featured groups that still play major roles at City College. Hua Sheng, or China Voice, was a handwritten feature published weekly in the Free Critic under the name Han for English speakers. The Associated Students and Chinese students pushed for the project despite initial opposition, and it became a regular part of the student-run Critic.

COMMUNITY AND NEW MEDIA
Today, The Guardsman has expanded its scope under department chair Juan Gonzales to include community-wide news stories, a website and Facebook page, and color photos. Etc. Magazine features longer-form stories from City College’s journalism students. Like The Guardsman, it covers issues affecting the school and its surrounding community, such as the ongoing fight for accreditation. The newspaper and magazine continually take top honors at the Journalism Association of Community Colleges state convention, and regularly win general excellence honors each semester. The publications join Forum, the English department’s literary journal (established 1937 and revived in the 2000s) to tell the story of City College through the printed – and digital – word.
——-Marynoel Strope, co-curator

Check out The Guardsman
Check out the CCSF Journalism Department

Download Celebrating 80 Years CCSF the exhibition assignment and list of resources.

Special thanks to Susan Hathaway who designed the running banner at the top of the cases with the many different mastheads The Guardsman has used over the years. Thanks also to Mark Albright and Johanna Rudolph.

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Library Stair Poem

This stair poem, which soars four floors up through the Rosenberg Library’s atrium is read from bottom to top by thousands of members of the College community everyday. The poem accompanies the Project Survive Exhibition. All thirteen quotes come from testimonials by Peer Educators of Project Survive. Traci Wrycza, Project Survive exhibition designer also designed the stair quotes. The idea for the stair poem was inspired by the Chimurenga Library Project at the San Francisco Public Library and resonates with the Groundswell Stairway Project, created by Leslie Simon.

Top Stairs Poem Bottom Stairs Poem 2

Roll back up to read the way students ascending the stairs do!

For more information contact Kate Connell,
Curator, Library Exhibition Program,  kconnell (at) ccsf dot edu

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Books Equal Art

Books

October 2014 – January 2015
4th Floor Reference Case West, Rosenberg Library
Library Hours

Books Equal Art/Books = Art, especially when they’re handmade books from Tara Books, printed books from Nobrow Press, books made of bamboo or an interactive book by young artist Ruby Alaniz-Hamer or I have Seen the Promised Land, a collaboratively created graphic novel by Bengal painter, Manu Chitrakar, African American griot, writer and performer Arthur Flowers and Italian designer Guglielmo Rossi at the provocation of Tara Books.

Tara Books’ blog lead us to another fascinating press:
Los lenateros title

All books on display were lent by the artists or purchased from Bird & Beckett, book lovers and presenters of free concerts in Glen Park, San Francisco, California.

Tara Books’ I Have Seen the Promised Land and Sita’s Ramayana will both be added to the CCSF Library in Spring 2015.

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Between the Leaves… Pictures Nestle on the Pages of Books

4th Floor, Rosenberg Library
City College of San Francisco,
Ocean Campus

Location and Hours

Between the Leaves

Art doesn’t just hang on museum walls. When it appears in books, you can hold it in your hands. The City College Library collection has millions of beautiful images nestled on the pages of books. Like text, pictures are information. Paintings, photographs, etchings, sculpture, collages and illustrations, all convey visual information in unique ways. Within a book, text supplies a context for images, making it even more possible to decipher them. What do the images in these books bring to mind? The work of internationally known artists from the present and last decades is on display: Chris Ware, Ben Shahn, Norman Rockwell and more. The images range from woodcuts in Wild Pilgrimage (1932), a wordless novel by Lynd Ward to drawings by Edith M. Cowles who used colored pencil to draw the frescoes of artist Giotto di Bondone for the 1931 portfolio Giotto, the Legend of St. Francis as Depicted in the Assisi Frescoes. Chris Ware’s multi-publication Building Stories, 2012, is also on display. Can you find the names of artists and illustrators of books as easily as you find the book’s author? Sometimes this depends on what era the book was published in.

Between the Leaves 

Between the Leaves Rockwell cover      Between the Leaves Face pages

Between the Leaves Master of the Day of Judgement

Click here to download the Library assignment on the Between the Leaves exhibition

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